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Generative Design and 3D Printing in Fashion

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3D Printing in Fashion

The prominence of parametric and generative design is currently rising and gaining more popularity. Generative design is implemented using digital innovations and technology. The computational design makes mass manufacturing more convenient in various sectors. With the help of computer technology, these designs can be transformed into numerous design options and possibilities which is the main factor making it one of the leading design approaches in the current era. As a result, it’s no wonder that the generative design and 3D printing industry is leading in various sectors, including architecture, fashion industry, and industrial designs, to mention a few.

The efficiency of parametric and generative designs can be enhanced with the aid of 3D printing technology. It is effective to generate structural features, sculptures, or even 3D printed dresses. Parametric design plays a vital role in the effective visualization of the design and has broadened the design vision by offering more dynamic and versatile models.

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Computational design and 3D printing are being chosen in various sectors and the popularity of this approach is increasing rapidly. The fashion industry is aligning towards parametric design equipped with 3D printing for greater compatibility. This hi-tech design approach enables the buyers to access virtual models online and print them. This trend has various advantages like offering freedom to generate multiple products with one single model and it minimizes the manufacturing time. The tech-oriented approach copes with the latest demands and coincides with the tendencies of the market. 

Here are the top 10 leading designers and their fashion products generated with parametric and generative design approaches.

1. Julia Koerner Design for life for Dassault System

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Disney

The very first designer to be featured in a series composing 6 videos as a part of Design for Life, Julia Koerner adopted technology to implement architecture design techniques in fashion and costume designing. The collaboration between Dassault Systemes and Dezeen aimed at highlighting works of designers utilizing innovations and research for a better world. 

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Disney

Julia enhanced the traditional designs with cutting-edge technology to generate an intriguing filigree structure of the crown worn by Queen Ramonda and the shoulder mantle. This 3D printed dress demonstrates the advancement in technologies and reflects the fictitious world of Wakanda’s technical progress and at the same time evokes patterns of the traditional Zulu attire.

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Disney

3D printing in the fashion industry offers fantastic potential as there are minimal restrictions for the shape and geometry of the costume.

2. Dragonfly, a 3D Printed Dress by Oleg Soroko and Mintsev Kirill

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Semyon Plankov

Two Russian designers – Oleg Soroko and Minstev Kirill collaborated in the fields of fashion and parametric design to generate Dragonfly – a 3D printed dress. This dress is composed of two parts with the upper one being solid geometry and the lower part designed as chainmail.

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Semyon Plankov

The concept behind this dress design was to make it simple and complicated at the same time. The complexity demonstrates the capabilities 3D printing beholds and its scope in the future of the fashion industry to make costumes wearable for utmost comfort.

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Semyon Plankov

The 3D printing offered designers the opportunity to incorporate parametric patterns which otherwise couldn’t be achieved with the conventional ways.

3. Neri Oxman’s Wearable Structures: Interplanetary Voyages

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Yoram Reshef

Neri Oxman’s 3D printing wearing capillaries are injected with synthetically created microbes to make the concept of hostile livable and the lethal life for interstellar travelers.

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Yoram Reshef

Each creation is a codex of the living and the dead, with a beginning and an end: the source being artificial organisms that proliferate to build the wearable beneath 3D printed covers, and the last resort being a distinct planet in the universe.

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Yoram Reshef

The 3D printed dresses by Neri Oxman are meant to engage with a particular setting unique to their location and create adequate amounts of biomass, moisture, air, and illumination to support life.

4. Amphibio by Jun Kamei

3D Printing in Fashion
Photograph: © Jun Kamei

AMPHIBIO is an article of aquatic clothing with a gill that is 3D printed. It was created for a scenario in which humans live in close proximity to water, and it gives everyday relaxation to those who spend much time in the water as they do on earth.

Photograph: © Jun Kamei
Photograph: © Jun Kamei

This dress is composed of a porous hydrophobic polymer that allows for underwater respiration. Using modern advanced manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing, the newly created material may be molded into intricate shapes.

5. Maria Alejandra Mora-Sanchez’s 3D Printed Dress – LOOM

Photograph: © 3ders

Designed by Maria Alejandra Mora-Sanchez, LOOM is a 3D printed garment that is elastic, adaptive, wearable, and adjustable to all body shapes and modifications. With the introduction of new designer apparel in collaboration with Cosine Additive, Houston-based creator is leading the way for 3D printed clothes.

Photograph: © 3ders

The Wayuu tribe, an Ethnic community of the Guajira Peninsula in northern Colombia and northwestern Venezuela for whom the crafts are shaped by nature and the tribe’s local surroundings, was the source of the pattern concept for the designer.

Photograph: © 3ders

With computational design and local inspirations, the end product is a fashionable and innovative 3D printed dress adaptable to different body structures.

6. Object 12-1 Designed by Matija Čop

Photograph: © Matija Čop

Fashion and architecture have been linked since antiquity, but not in such a direct way. Object 12-1 is an item of futuristic clothing designed by Croatian designer Matija op and influenced by Gothic architecture with interweaving elements. These clothes are skilled in a structural game with foam pieces including construction technology and shapes inspired by the Gothic style. The project is truly a great example of using 3D printing in fashion.

Photograph: © Matija Čop

The costume design allows for the assembly of various sized elements to produce sculptural structures that recall the Gothic’s great arches and famous domes dismantled, rearranged, and reinvented in a contemporary way.

Photograph: © Matija Čop

The shapes flow and have a mystical interpretation, making a statement that goes beyond sentiments and deeds.

7. Interactive Wearable Designs- 3D Printed Dresses by Anouk Wipprecht

Photograph: © Anouk Wipprecht

Dutch fashion-tech designer located in Miami, Anouk Wipprecht, looks into using hi-tech to improve the user experience in the fashion sector. She creates clothes that interact with the human and responds utilizing micro-controller technology and artificial intelligence since her primary objective is to represent the user’s psychological emotions. 

Photograph: © Anouk Wipprecht

Human senses, which are impacted by numerous external situations, are primarily responsible for this type of fashion technology’s behavior.

Photograph: © Anouk Wipprecht

One of her pieces, the Smoke Dress, creates a smoke veil that covers the user’s personal boundaries when it is disturbed by anyone else, demonstrating a conversation between the user and the surroundings. A back-mounted silicon-based smoking system is activated by a microcontroller and proximity embedded sensors. 

8. Jessica Rosenkrantz’s Nervous Systems – Kinematic Petal Dress

Photograph: © Jessica Rosenkrantz
Photograph: © Jessica Rosenkrantz

The fashion industry has been allowed to express itself in amorously dispersed ways thanks to digital visualization and computational design tools. The Kinematic Petal Dress is a blossoming invention, a material language that Jessica Rosenkrantz’s Nervous System investigated, developed, and 3D printed. 

Photograph: © Jessica Rosenkrantz

The 3D printed dress, which is reminiscent of mythical armor and is delicately piled in parametric blooms, creates a vision of creative wearing. The garment fits the body flawlessly, with beautiful interconnecting nodes that look like bird feathers enveloping the skin. Fresh off the 3D printer, the design combines attractiveness and comfort.

9. Iridescence, Behnaz Farahi’s Interactive Collar

Photograph: © Kristina Varaksina

The Iridescence is a reactive, 3D-printed, and emotional collar designed by famous designer and inventor Behnaz Farahi that employs a number of actuators and vision-activated technologies to track the sight and respond with life-like behavior.

Photograph: © Kristina Varaksina

The gorget of Anna’s hummingbird influenced Iridescence, a unique interactive collar. It comes with a face-tracking camera as well as 200 spinning quills. In reaction to the motion of observers and their facial emotions, the customized quills change color and begin to form patterns.

Photograph: © Kristina Varaksina

This project aims to investigate the potential of AI facial scanning technology as well as the dynamic behavior of an intelligent fashion piece. The goal is to look at psychological difficulties including feelings and sensations, as well as how these innovations may influence human communication.

10. Zac Posen Dresses for the 2019 Met Gala

Photograph: © Dimitrios Kambouris

3D printing has been making its way into the fashion world for a few years now, providing limitless style and form complexity options.

The Met Gala is without a question one of the world’s greatest fashion events, uniting celebrities and emerging designers to encourage innovation and creativity. Designer Zac Posen collaborated with GE Additive and Protolabs to produce unique 3D printed elements, whether it was a whole costume or embellishments, for the Met Gala 2019.

Photograph: © Dimitrios Kambouris

Nina Dobrev appeared in a custom 3D-printed bustier that was hand-sanded and then treated with a clear lacquer to offer it a glassy sheen. It took almost 200 hours to complete the dress.

Photograph: © Dimitrios Kambouris

408 pieces of 3D-printed embroidery were affixed to the exterior of Deepika Padukone’s shimmery pink lurex jacquard dress. It took more than 160 hours to produce and was manufactured in North Carolina.

Posen utilized 3D printing to make pieces of the gowns worn by superstars at the Camp-themed party, a concept he’d had for a long time.

The Craftsmanship of the Fashion Industry infused with Parametric Design

Photograph: © Anouk Wipprecht

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The dominance of computational design in parametric architecture has made its way to the fashion industry as well. Combining garment design craftsmanship with parametric design structural features enables for not only creative but also technical designs. When coupled with 3D printing, this is extremely successful.

The production of a comprehensive collection of fashion goods utilizing 3D printed parametric designs is demonstrated through the development of numerous products including gowns, coats, and accessories. This also indicates the prospect of creating personalized fashion products that fit the demands of the wearer, particularly if the 3D modeling technique is adapted to the human body’s proportions. Despite several obstacles, 3D printing can not only generate parametric clothing but also has limitless possibilities. Technology is progressing at a breakneck pace. It’s never been more vital to embrace and use more technological methods to fashion design than it is today.

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