Persepolis Entrance Pavilion with Doubly Curved Designed by theAlliance Works

Persepolis
Persepolis

Doubly surfaced planar curves, streams an exciting facade of intrigue. Persepolis Entrance Pavilion axially visioned by theAlliance Works presents a 200 square metres open space, with a multi-functional linear pavilion at the entrance of Iran’s renowned UNESCO World Heritage Site, The Persepolis. The firm adheres to its motto of rethinking the alliance between tools, materials, geometry and industrial procedures to craft and visualize an alternative architecture and design expression.

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Developed along a form-finding process steered by an indirect modelling algorithm. The axial lines of the space at its core, meanderingly explore the form-finding and chiselling the geometry. A strategy of “Medial Surfaces” executed by controlling axial lines, eliminate the direct control over the surface’s geometry.

Persepolis

The curvaceous expression divides the spaces into 3 main zones: the entrance, a VIP room for guests and the main hall, ensuring the core of the project and integrates a gathering area for a variety of cultural events, such as exhibitions, lectures, and book publishing events.

Persepolis

The doubly-curved surface rationally translates into planar quad panels, breaking down the constructability in response to a limited execution budget. Extracting the conjugated line network of the quasi-minimal surface and interweaving the intersection nodes, crafts a set of planar quad cells. These planar quads are manufactured in aluminium sheets through laser cutting and then winded and twisted using a CNC bending machine to envisage the edges.

Persepolis

Intelligent geometric rationalization drastically dilutes the fabrication, and construction costs to configure the design. The simplification of complex geometry through mathematically driven algorithms imbues economically aesthetic dreams.

Persepolis
Persepolis

Obviously heeding to UNESCO’s unique regulations on construction in World Heritage Sites, the pavilion erects a semi-temporary structure, deprived of permanent masonry materials. Enabling the Persepolis pavilion the ability to dismount from the site. Each element of the wooden structure incorporated into the pavilion, unique in terms of geometrical properties, is pre-fabricated and deployed to the construction site, along with the aluminium panels.

The entire fabrication and assembly underwent a two-month period enabled by the pre-fabricated approach to construction, with an easy dismantling option entwined into the Persepolis Entrance pavilion.

Project Details
Architects: theAlliance
Area: 200 m²
Photographs: Deed Studio
Manufacturers: Compars, North Star Lighting, Sveza
Design: Mehrad Mahnia, Alireza Bayramvand
Geometrical Rationalization: Mehrad Mahnia, Alireza Bayramvand
Detail Design: Mehrad Mahnia, Alireza Bayramvand
Wooden Structure Consultant: Mohammad Panahi, Behrang Bani Adam
Steel Platform Structure: Alireza Miri
Wooden Structure Modelling And Analyzing: Reza Fattahi
Fabrication Director: Mehrad Mahnia
Fabrication Team: Hassan Asnavandi, Mohammad Mahdi Sefidi, Alireza Bayramvand, Nima Safari, Soroush Asadi, Aria Sanei, Ehsan Alereza, Saman Zaree
City: Marvdasht
Country: Iran

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Dragon Palace: Beguiling Bamboo Pavilion by Cheng-Tsung Feng Inspired by Marine Wildlife Anatomy

To an artist, the expression of the land, sea and air exudes a fascinating vision of elements to be inspired from. Dragon Palace, a structural play of bamboo and wood lightly woven in white rope, imbues a mesmerising take on marine wildlife anatomy visualized and moulded by the artist Cheng-Tsung Feng.

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Best Granite Countertops for Your Kitchen

Best Granite Countertops

Best Granite Countertops for Your Kitchen

We can agree that granite has been the go-to material for many of our kitchen countertops. From its durability to its unique looks, granite seems like the perfect choice. However, with so many types and colors of granite on the market, it can be extremely hard to find the right one for your kitchen. Luckily, we are here to help you by taking a look at the best granite kitchen countertops

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Black Galaxy Granite

Black Galaxy countertops are made out of a black granite rock filled with gold and white dots. These dots can range from small to large and add to the overall chic style of this countertop. But what makes the Black Galaxy countertop unique is how it shines when light hits the little dots, making them radiate. We could even say that it creates a luxurious atmosphere inside your kitchen, complementing its style. 

All in all, Black Galaxy countertops are good-looking, extremely durable, and easy to maintain. As a result, they are a perfect choice for all types of kitchens and designs. 

Best Granite Countertops

New Venetian Gold Granite

New Venetian Gold is a type of gold granite that emulates the sun’s warmth inside your kitchen. Its golden and beige tones intertwine with soft veins of red, deep gray, and brown. This creates a fresh and ethereal look. And when matched with neutral-colored kitchen cabinets, the New Venetian Gold countertop will make your kitchen feel more vibrant.

You should definitely consider buying a New Venetian Gold countertop, especially if you want to go for an elegant yet traditional-looking kitchen. We could even argue that buying this splendid countertop is the easiest way to increase your home’s overall value.

New Caledonia Granite

New Caledonia granite is a unique and beautiful type of gray granite. Its complex shades of whites and grays range from light to charcoal, creating a high-class feeling. And its specific grainy look makes it easy to combine this gorgeous countertop with most types of kitchen furniture.

If you want a classy yet modern kitchen design, then the New Caledonia countertop is your best choice. Not only is it gorgeous, but it’s easy to clean and, with proper maintenance, should last you a lifetime.

River White Granite

Although River White granite is more popular in Europe and India, it has recently made its way to America. With a simple white base filled with dark gray veins and deep red flecks, this countertop could seem basic and bland. However, each slab is unique and features a variety of cream, blue and gray patterns. In other words, it will be almost impossible to find two similar-looking River White countertops.

Its durability and unique look make this countertop a no-brainer for both classic and fresh-looking kitchens. 

Steel Gray Granite

Steel Gray granite is a durable stone that has a variety of gray patterns, shades, and small spots of lighter gray. Thanks to their darker colors and shades, Steel Gray countertops are the embodiment of elegance and high-class looks. Yet, the overall pattern and colors might seem too dark for some people who want a brighter kitchen. But if you match a Steel Gray countertop with neutral or light cabinets, you can create a feeling of mystery throughout the entire kitchen. 

In our opinion, Steel Gray countertops are the perfect way to use a traditional stone to create a unique kitchen design. And while there are other, brighter options, Steel Gray is a unique and durable symbol of elegance. 

Final Thoughts

Overall, there is a variety of granite countertops that you can choose from, no matter your budget or taste. From the chic Black Galaxy to the natural-looking New Venetian Gold, there’s no shortage of unique designs. And if you ever have trouble finding the perfect countertop, you can always come back and check our recommendations. 

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Joris Laarman with MX3D & Arup Fabricates a 3D Printed Pedestrian Steel Bridge in Amsterdam

3D Printed Steel Bridge

Metallic curves and embellishing contours. The newly opened pedestrian bridge in Amsterdam shimmers in stainless steel. Joris Laarman with MX3D & Arup collaborated to fabricate a 12-metre long 3D printed steel bridge in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Six robotic arms equipped with welding gear spans the Oudezijds Achterburgwal in Amsterdam’s Red Light District, crafted in a factory and assembled on site. the curvaceous form from either side and finishing in the centre.

Learn more about parametric design by joining our studios:

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3D Printed Steel Bridge

Called as MX3D Bridge, the structure integrated 4,500 kilograms of stainless steel, 3D-printed by robots in a factory over six months and craned into position over the canal. They assembled the bridge in two parts, aligning and devising atop the canal, overcoming many challenges.

3D Printed Steel Bridge

The design curves like an S with balustrades with lattice-style perforations designed using parametric modelling software. The design team showcased the techniques of 3D-printing technology, and how it can lead to functional structures using less material.

3D Printed Steel Bridge

Gijs van der Velden, Co-Founder of MX3D said “This robotic technology finally allows larger optimized designs to be 3D-printed in metal. This causes significant weight reduction and reduced impact for parts manufactured in the tooling, oil and gas and construction industries.”

3D Printed Steel Bridge

Stijn Joosten, Structural Engineer at Arup said “The industry is facing a tremendous challenge in becoming carbon-neutral by 2050. By stepping up our game and the will to make a change as designers and engineers, we can bring the necessary innovation to make a difference in tomorrow’s built environment.”

3D Printed Steel Bridge

Architect Philip Oldfield, Head of the art, design and architecture school at the University of New South Wales in Australia, calculated and tweeted, that the stainless steel used in the structure measures up to 27.7 tonnes of embodied carbon to span a few metres, specifically 6.15 CO2/kg.

3D Printed Steel Bridge

The Alan Turing Institute and Arup tailored the bridge with sensors that allow to record and collect data, building a digital twin to keep track of its performance and health. The digital twin will monitor corrosion, load changes, environmental conditions and pedestrian usage in efforts to further the concept of data-centric design.

3D Printed Steel Bridge

Joris Laarman explained the idea for the bridge was to integrate robotic arms with welding machines weaving a machine capable of printing furniture. “By adding small amounts of molten metal at a time, we could print lines in mid-air, ” he added.

3D Printed Steel Bridge
3D Printed Steel Bridge

The welding machine later formed the basis of MX3D, which Laarman co-founded to explore the potential for printing larger-scale objects. The bridge has undergone multiple iterations since its inception in 2015. The original plan was to 3D print and fabricate the entire structure across the canal in situ, with robots working from both banks welding the bridge beneath them until they met in the middle. The final iteration ensued the bridge built as two parts at an off-site facility. The designers strengthened the structure to be more in line with council regulations and protection against potential boat collisions.

Learn more about computational design at the CD NEXT conference series:

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Zaha Hadid Architects Define Library and Learning Centre University of Economics Vienna In Sharp Angles

Library and Learning Centre

Zaha Hadid Architects takes a sharp angle in the vision of the new Library and Learning Centre as a polygonal block rising from the heart of the new University of Economics Vienna campus. The external circulation of the master plan maps out the different levels of the building carving the interior of the LLC.

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Kinematic Petal Dress Knitted by Jessica Rosenkrantz’s Nervous System

Kinematic Petal Dress
Kinematic Petal Dress

Digital visualization and computational tools have streaked the fashion industry to express in amorously fragmented forms. Kinematic Petal Dress presents a flowering innovation, a textile language explored, designed and 3D printed by Jessica Rosenkrantz’s studio Nervous System. Reminiscing as a mystical armour, and exquisitely layered in parametric petals, the attire crafts a vision of artistic dressing.

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The dress aligns perfectly to your body, covering the skin with elegant interlocking nodes, like feathers of a bird. Rosenkrantz’s Kinematic Petals Dress takes an enigmatic inspiration from the quote ‘Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic’ by Arthur C. Clarke.

Kinematic Petal Dress

The design notably fuses elegance and wearability fresh out of the 3D printer. Individually sculpted after scanning the wearer’s body and adapting the structural fabric, then digitally laced and encrusted in scaling petal pieces.

Kinematic Petal Dress

Rosenkrantz vision feathers the 3D-printed fashion to the glitzy, sculptural couture that dominates in stylistic and glamourous perception. Her intentions looked beyond science fiction, to accomplish something solid and innovative, throttling challenges in the arena of 3D printing and engage people in visualizing their own attire. The spirit of customization was the prime principle that drove Rosenkrantz philosophy.

Plumes overlap in ergonomic fashion, as imbricated shells protrude from the underlying fabric of tessellated triangular panels, sheathing the body in a directional landscape. As each component locks in place, they behave in an auxiliary action. Durable nylon plastic made by Selective Laser Sintering composes the dress in the 3D-printed format. The dress integrates over 1600 unique pieces woven by over 2600 hinges, emerging out as a ready-to-wear attire after assembly and printing. Also employed with a smart folding strategy to compress Kinematic garments into a smaller form for efficient fabrication. By folding the garments prior to printing them, the designers can weave complex structures larger than the 3D printer, thus unfolding intended shapes.

Kinematic Petal Dress truly embellishes a giant leap for fashion industry. The synergy of technology, mathematics and art cherishing the red top as it sways, flaps and assembles in beguiling orientations. The designers at Nervous System have cracked a neoteric nerve to the concept of costume and comfort.

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Striatus: A 3D Concrete Printed Masonry Bridge in Venice, Italy

Striatus
Striatus

Striatus presents a 3D printed concrete footbridge envisioned by Block Research Group (BRG) at ETH Zurich and Zaha Hadid Architects Computation and Design Group (ZHACODE), in collaboration with incremental3D (in3D), made possible by Holcim, located in Venice, Italy. The design exposes an assembly of blocks without mortar and unreinforced masonry.

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Striatus

The designers exhibited the sculpturesque structure at the Giardini Della Marinaressa during the Venice Architecture Biennale until November 2021. Spanning 16×12-metres, the footbridge integrates traditional techniques of master builders with advanced computational algorithms, engineering mechanics and robotics. “Striatus” stands to reflect the structural logic and fabrication procedure. The concrete stack in multiple layers orthogonal to the central structural forces, creating a “striated” compression-only funicular structure devoid of reinforcement.

Striatus

Proposing a new language for concrete presses the idea ‘to build more with less. Structurally informed, fabrication aware, ecologically responsible and precisely placed, Striatus optimises interconnected properties of masonry structures. The precise geometry of Striatus gives strength to the unreinforced concrete structure. Concrete performs the best in compression to achieve arched and vaulted assemblies, with accurate forces travelling to the supports in pure compression. The entire construction is devoid of conventional accumulation of materials as in beams and flat floor slabs. The new language significantly reduces the amount of material to span space and the possibility to build with lower-strength and less-polluting alternatives.

Striatus

Striatus follows a sustainable nature, placing materials wherever needed, thus reducing its environmental footprint. Stripping reinforcement and incorporating dry assembly without binders, Striatus can reassemble and repurpose repeatedly. Adhering to the philosophy of three R’s of sustainability (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) on concrete structures.

Striatus

Reduce: Lowering embodied emissions through structural geometry and additive manufacturing that minimises the consumption of resources and eliminates construction waste.
Reuse: Improving circularity and longevity. Unlike conventional reinforced concrete structures, Striatus is dry assembled with no binder or glue, enabling the bridge to dismantle and reuse in other locations.
Recycle: By ensuring fresh materials are separated and separable, the designers can easily recycle each component of Striatus with minimal energy and cost.

Striatus uses a two-component (2K) concrete ink, unlike typical 3D printing extrusion in simple horizontal layers. The corresponding printing head and pumping arrangement precisely prints in non-uniform and non-parallel layers via a 6-axis called the multi-DOF robotic arm. This new technology of 3D concrete printing, in combination with the arched masonry design, allows the subsequent components to withhold structurally bereft of reinforcement or post-tensioning.

Striatus redefines conventional interdisciplinary relations by integrating design, engineering, fabrication and construction mechanisms. Well-defined data exchange between the various domain-specific software toolchains involved in the process enables the precise manufacturing of the blocks. The co-development approach facilitates the use of COMPAS, an open-source computational framework for collaboration and research in the AEC industry.

Striatus offers an alternative blueprint for building more with less. Envisaged with the same structural principles and fully integrated computational design-to-fabrication techniques. The form explores a vaulted, rib-stiffened, unreinforced concrete ground developed by the Block Research Group in partnership with Holcim.

Striatus

The new floor system uses only 30% of the volume of concrete and 10% steel. The low stresses within the funicular structure empower the use of low-embodied-carbon concrete, including high percentages of recycled construction waste. Prefabricated and dry-assembled, and therefore fully demountable and reusable, the floor system easily cleans and recycles at the end of its life.

Over about 300 billion square metres of floor area to be constructed worldwide over the next 30 years, and floors comprising over 40% of the weight of most high-rise buildings (10+ storeys), introducing the principles explored by Striatus would truly interrupt the construction industry and usher a new future to transform how we design and construct our built environment while addressing the defining challenges of our era.

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Endesa Pavilion Designed by IAAC (Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia)

Endesa Pavilion

The classic architecture quote ‘Form Follows Function’ has been deployed and defined in a variety of connotations. Endesa Pavilion, envisaged by the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) iterates the statement ‘Form Follows Energy’. An amalgamation of angular boxed structures displays a self-sufficient solar prototype installed at the Marina Dock, within the framework of the International BCN Smart City Congress.

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Endesa Pavilion

The structure engages as a control room for monitoring and testing several projects related to intelligent energy management. Endesa Pavilion marks as a prototype for multi-scaled architectural construction and procedures. The facade extrudes in a modular arrangement, placing each component composed like solar brick, adhering to the photovoltaic acquisition, solar protection, insulation, ventilation, and lighting. The same logic behind the parametric adapts the cubic geometries to the specific environmental requirements as each angle and plane directs to the desired destination.

Endesa Pavilion

Interior and exterior spaces interact with the users in a humble persona. A single component integrates all levels of intelligence required by the building. The facade unfastens, reacting to the solar path, being active and becoming permeable towards the south, while becoming closed and protective towards the north. The behaviour of this crisply defined skin makes evidently visible to the environmental and climatic processes that weave the prototypes.

Endesa Pavilion

Endesa Pavilion

The final geometry retorts to the energy of the place. Thus, the pavilion becomes permeable and active towards the south, where the interaction energy maximises.; Towards north comes opaque, closed and protective, minimising the heat transfer. Higher overhangs allow more energy collection and greater protection against the incident radiation during summer. Solar calculation software, connected to the logic of parametric design, allows us to reach an optimised solution. Each module, at each point, responds with analytical accuracy to the specific stresses of the distinctive orientation and position.

The current digital fabrication techniques, and the latest advances in energy management and distributed production, make technology closer to the user, open and partaking. The Endesa Pavilion is an accessible device, technologically soft and easily comprehensible. Its development, materials and energy, and its climatic behaviour are transparent to the inhabitant. The team has applied digital fabrication procedures to speed up the construction times. Each piece frames a unique code, the assembly comes later like solving a 3D puzzle.

Architects: Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) / Arch. Rodrigo Rubio and Arch. Miguel Guerrero
Wood Engineering: Fupicsa (MetsäWood)
Photovoltaic Engineering: TFM (Comsa)
Promoted by: Visoren SA
Client: Endesa
Photographer: Adriá Goula

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Computational Design: NEXT 6.0

Computational Design: NEXT is a collaborative initiative by some of the global frontiers of computational design to open up an Online Learning platform as a comprehensive ONLINE CONFERENCE comprising of discussions, dialogues, tutorials, and mentorship to a global audience through thought-provoking and meaningful dialogues curated by ParametricArchitecture (PA), one of the leading media platforms focussing on Computational Design and its various subsets.

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