V&A Museum Scores A Layered-Up Manifestation By Kengo Kuma and Associates In Dundee

V&A Museum
V&A Museum

Visually stirring horizontal elements layer up in enigmatic fashion, stacked and assembled to outline as a massive museum streaming through waters. Kengo Kuma and Associates envisions V&A museum, a sculptural icon located along the waterfront in the city of Dundee in Northern Scotland. The Victoria & Albert Museum enshrines itself as a uniquely showcased element with architectural magic strewn about it. The design of the museum replicates the concept of a liner composed of dashing concrete pieces elevated in sharp angles and verticals.

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The gaudian exposition of the museum, in addition, exhibits assorted artwork in the V&A collection. The spectacle integrates contemporary Scottish art and product design from their surrounding context, configuring an opportunity, making it a facility expected to become a new cultural centre in Scotland.

V&A Museum
V&A Museum

The site slashes against the magnificent River Tay, and the architecture proposes in a brutalist manner while achieving harmony and compositional affluence with the environment. The façade heralds a variety of shadows and alterations buffered along with horizontal layers of precast concrete. The architecture reminisces about expressing the beautiful serenading cliffs of Scotland into its elegant charm.

V&A Museum
V&A Museum
V&A Museum
V&A Museum

Incorporating a large horizontal “hole” infused in the centre of the building represents an attempt to connect Union Street, which runs through the centre of Dundee, with the beautiful natural scenery of the River Tay. This modern 21st-century feature adopts to overthrow the 20th-century type of museum, where they cut off from the surrounding fabric yet unite within the contextual drama.

The foyer ensembles a large void wrapped with local wood in a soft texture. The interior space intends to be used as a ‘Living Room’ to revitalize the community by providing a venue where various concerts and performances can accomplish and flourish in prominence. The other exhibition spaces are well composed in deft quality and vital use of materials. A daring black metal staircase streams from the large hall, defining a bold stature in the interior space.

The V&A Museum stands exceptional and riveting in its myriad ways. Kengo Kuma reflects upon the image of a cultural centre that opens doors to the public and delves into the natural fabric of its scene.

Project Details
Architects: Kengo Kuma and Associates
Area: 8500 m²
Photographs: Hufton+Crow
Architectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130
Delivery Architect:PiM.studio Architects
Executive Architect: James F Stephen Architects
Structural/Maritime And Civil Engineer: Arup Mechanical
Electrical, Fire And Acoustic Engineer: Arup Façade Engineering
Wayfinding And Signage: Cartlidge Levene
Designer: Kengo Kuma & Associates, PiM.studio Architects
Principal Designer Advisor:C-MIST DDA
Consultants: C-MIST, James F Stephen Architects
Water Feature Specialist: Fountains Direct
Partners In Charge:Kengo Kuma, Yuki Ikeguchi, Teppei Fujiwara
Project Architect:Maurizio Mucciola
City: Dundee
Country: United Kingdom

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Undurraga Devés Arquitectos Criss-Crossed Structural Framework for Chilean Pavilion

Chilean Pavilion
Chilean Pavilion

Undurraga Devés Arquitectos wooden criss-cross framed structure for Chilean Pavilion – Expo Milano acted as a massive showcase mounted on steel columns. The striking entrance to the building exhibited metallic black staircases and ramps curling from the ground. The space below the columns presented a vast open space envisaged for functions cum relaxing area, along with coffee shops and other accessories. The building displayed a complex facade articulation while ushering balance between inside and outside as a transparent element.

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Chilean Pavilion

The designers intrigued by the sustainable idea of a pavilion that can reconfigure after the six months of the world fair. With that knowledge and concept of restoration, the means to extend a structure’s lifecycle become the driving force. The team designed a wooden Meccano like structure that can easily assemble, disassembled, transported and reassembled in a new location back in Chile. The spaces made flexible to host different routines and scenarios in the future. Once the Expo finished, they decided to move the pavilion to its new home at Temuco, the capital city of the Araucanía Region. The chosen site was at the foot of national park Cerro Ñielol, a natural hill significant for its proximity to the city centre and a sacred place for the Mapuche (native inhabitants of the region).

Chilean Pavilion
Chilean Pavilion

The concept of building the whole Chilean Pavilion on wooden arose from the beautiful and rich tradition of wood construction in the country, which roots from the European colonization of America. Being one of our most critical natural resources, Wood is a renewable material, and Chile is one of the countries with the highest reforesting rates on the planet. The pavilion conceived as a simple box or container whose expression defined by its reticulated structure.

The blend of structure and architecture in its totality acquired a monumental scale. As you get closer, the complexity of the design and the size of its components contribute to the building quality and human scale. The wooden box sits on six steel pillars with a “bridge-like” condition liberating the ground floor, creating visual transparency and allowing free strolling space for the visitors. The strategy also establishes a close relationship between urban space and intimate space, narrowing and fusing the line between the public and the private.

Chilean Pavilion

For both scenarios, Milan and Temuco, the building ensured to feel public. The open ground floor, reinforced by a large green square, welcomes the visitor before the exhibition arena. The showcase, named “El Amor the Chile”, speaks of the chain of affections involved in producing foods expressed through a series of audio-visual installations and ending back on the ground floor, where the public can taste Chilean food by sharing a 50 meters long single table.

Chilean Pavilion

The Chilean Pavilion integrates a small auditorium and a multipurpose room with independent access, allowing hosting temporary events without interrupting the regular exhibit. It also has a shop for selling products from small producers and artisans—the outdoors green areas exposed for fancy occasions such as concerts or craft fairs.

Chilean Pavilion

Project Details
Architects: Undurraga Devés Arquitectos
Area: 1720 m²
Photographs: Roland Halbe, Sebastián Mallea, Cristian Undurraga, Carlos Massmann
Manufacturers: Albertani, Arauco, Stahlbau
Wooden Structure:Albertani
Construction Companies:Sarapalti (Italia), Constructora San Ignacio (Chile), ASAP (Chile)
Client: Gobierno de Chile
Principal Architect: Cristian Undurraga
Executive Architect: Sebastián Mallea
Associated Architects: Progettisti Associati (Italia)
Principal Architect (Progettisti Associati): Hugo Silano
City: Temuco
Country: Chile

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CAAT Studio Presents ‘Brick Modelled’ Kahrizak Residential Project

CAAT Studio
CAAT Studio

Tracing the traditional architecture of desert areas, CAAT Studio weaves a modular brick design based on the Iranian geometric patterns. Kahrizak Residential Project determined to improve the living conditions of the thriving residents. The designers conceived an exceptional building with resourceful solutions appropriately sieved into the accommodation factor and serving the region’s climate. The design entails the cultural typology of a cost-effective method without charring the quality or the standard, achieved through effective interaction and cooperation between the architect, the client and the collaborators.

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The historical principle in Iranian architecture focuses on rich details and coexistence with simplicity in overall scale, which entwines with the context and functions. In traditional Iranian architecture, dwellers built their houses following sustainable and climatic conditions. These architectural considerations led to creating a variety of typologies invoked from different climatic zones of the country.

CAAT Studio

The choice of material was significant to choose something affordable and easily freight to the site. The designers considered clay blocks, which were produced in a factory nearby, and this considerably decreased the freight charges. The modules made of bricks made suitable for the segmented frames. The least expensive material that gave the ability to create the desired sense of space was concrete. This way, they reduced the project’s cost to its minimum while creating high-quality interior spaces.

CAAT Studio
CAAT Studio

The regional workers were specially trained under the exceptional team of CAAT studio. They skilfully arranged enough modules after a few test modules before the final construction phase started. The close collaboration between the architect and the client caused the progress of this project in a half-forgotten district and at last reaching the inhabitant’s satisfaction. A few units were sold out during the construction phase with the same price of a finished building in the neighbourhood, while there were so many completed buildings left unsold, thus acquiring few profits for the client.

Each brick module was designed concerning the function of the space behind it. The shifting variety in brick modules is coherent and homophonic. That aided in achieving a smooth facade to represent both Iranian brick architecture and residential essence. In addition, the geometry concretised for local workers, thus facilitating the construction process.

CAAT Studio

Architects: CAAT Studio
Area: 1660 m²
Location: Kahrizak, Tehran, Iran
Photographs: Parham Taghioff, Ashkan Radnia

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