NARTURE – Eco-Parametric Structures

NARTURE - Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

‘NARTURE’ is an Eco-Parametric Architectural structure created by 5 students: Abiodun Shonibare, Alessandro Farina, Mark Farhat Giusti, Romain Russe, and Vasiliki Tsimpouki known as the Puffer Team in the PAACADEMY’s ‘Eco-Parametric Structures’ studio workshop with Arthur-Mamou-Mani. This structure is located in the dense Dainava forest in Lithuania.

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NARTURE - Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

The Eco-Parametric Structures workshop organized by PAACADEMY was held from 2nd March to the 13th April 2021 on an online platform. Studio Mamou-Mani is one of the studio workshops at the PAACADEMY with a focus on combining sustainability with parametric design. The studio with the 6 intriguing sessions lead by London based architect, Arthur Mamou-Mani and his team was articulated on the topic of wooden construction through computational design methods. The session focused on developing a parametric, modular and environmentally conscious system in an online studio through interactive workshops and discussions.

Click here to register and watch the recordings.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

Description by designers: Imagine yourself escaping the busy city life and immersing yourself in the dense Dainava Lithuanian forest. It is a flat terrain filled with all types of pine trees, lakes and wetlands. The slow immersion into the forest through the colours of nature , its sound, its and even taste helps you to open up your senses, relax, regenerate intellectual focus and strengthen your mental and physical health. You watch the butterflies and dragonflies fly freely and in perfect harmony with its surroundings. You wish it were your home.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

As you bath yourself deep into that Dainavian forest you reach a series of wooden pinecone-like structures connected by net bridges. You think you have found Neverland. The inner peter pan in you wakes up. You feel joy and a sudden sense of child-like freedom and carefree happiness. You have awakened your soul.

This is the NARTURE.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

Pine-shaped wooden structures are carefully placed on tree barks – some are single others are doubled on top of each other. They are connected by net bridges and at the centre of each cone, there is a Fibonacci inspired spiral staircase that allows visitors to go up the cones and across until they reach the top of the trail thus allowing them to truly feel immersed within nature and experience it at each level as if that forest was their home.

NARTURE - Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

Nature works in a perfect circular ecosystem. The main inspirations for the structure are pinecones that close up to protect their seeds when sensing humidity and then open up to allow the seeds to fly freely and pollinate other cones. Pinecones have always been regarded as a symbol of regeneration, health and eternal life. Just like everything in nature the cone has a Fibonacci Spiral pattern. This golden ratio is responsible for creating all of nature’s patterns and balance.

NARTURE - Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

NARTURE is

To care for and protect Nature.
To nurture nature.
To regenerate the inner self.
To highlight on the importance of coexisting with nature.
To create a “experiential” space that promotes balance, harmony and a sense of childlike freedom.

NARTURE - Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / The Puffer Team

Arthur Mamou – Mani and his team from Mamou-Mani led 6 intriguing sessions with PAACADEMY’s ‘Eco-Parametric Structures studio workshop on creating an ecological solution through computational design methods. The session focused on developing a parametric, modular and environmentally conscious system in an online studio through interactive workshops and discussions.

Stay tuned with us to see more projects in the upcoming days from the PAACADEMY’s Eco-Parametric Structures workshop. Click here to register and watch the recordings.

Credits:

Studio workshop by PAACADEMY
Studio title: Eco-Parametric Structures
Lead by: Arthur Mamou-Mani and his team
Project name: NARTURE
Students: Abiodun Shonibare, Alessandro Farina, Mark Farhar Giusti, Romain Russe, and Vasiliki Tsimpouki
Date: 2nd March until 13th April 2021

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Die Spens & Winkel by Steyn Studio and Square One Landscape Architects

Garden Cafe
Die Spens & Winkel

A creative collaboration between London-based architects Steyn Studio and Square One Landscape Architects based in South Africa has stemmed an effortless fusion between architecture and landscape. The spellbinding design of the Die Spens & Winkel, a garden café that binds over gripping buildings and terrain with intricate trellis assemblies. Imbibing in Breedekloof Valley, South Africa’s Western Cape treasures a great cultural history, and the architects lure their inspiration from the stories of the valley.

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A small restaurant/café called ‘Die Spens’ (The Pantry) and gift shop (‘Winkel’), brewed on the Bosjes Estate, showcasing a fascinating and inspiring journey between the two key attractions on the estate: the well-known Bosjes Chapel and the Manor House. In addition, the two maintains their visual dialogue on the vivacious landscape.
The revitalizing garden concept usurps as a microcosm of the broader landscape, referencing the agricultural context. The land participates with delightful playscapes encouraging children and adults to immerse themselves within the natural biosphere and nestle in the dwelling’s warmth. Diverse ecologies integrate wetlands and biological water treatment systems with forest habitats and rehabilitated indigenous vegetation.

Die Spens & Winkel
Die Spens & Winkel

The design acknowledges the historic manor house and chapel on the estate and visually enhances their distinguished relationship. The two sits amiably breathing between vineyards and mountain backdrops, balancing the composition with fresh vegetation and a series of processional routes. The landscaping and buildings complement the existing architectural features of the estate. Subsequently, this follows a low visual profile with trees reinforcing the perspective and landscape features such as tree windbreaks stitching it into the surrounding rural landscape.

Die Spens & Winkel
Die Spens & Winkel
Die Spens & Winkel

Steyn Studio worked closely with Square One to position the built structures in enigma and anchors around the landscapes. The seamless integration of terrain with the built structures was an essential design objective from the project’s initiation. The landscaped gardens weave across three sloping terraces, connected by a curving pathway that provides universal access. Both buildings partially step into the slope. The roofs drape with soil, indigenous grasses and succulents to blend seamlessly into the landscape, leaving the panoramic mountain views unscathed.

The simple architectural form inspired by the San called a ‘Matjieshuis’ (Mat House), and the first dwellings of the Dutch settlers, called ‘KapHuis’ (Truss House), a hybrid of sorts between the two cultures intelligently weaved to envisage this contemporary avatar. The Matjieshuis was a portable, curved, slat-framed structure covered with woven mats, used by San herders as they migrated seasonally with their cattle during pre-colonial and early colonial times. The KapHuis was a series of A-frame trusses covered with thatch, with the interior lowered to allow for more headroom. Both structures were part of this historic landscape and blended subtly with their surroundings. The mounds of the new designs have an uncanny resemblance to the nearby serenading hills.

Convoluted & captivating curved oak trellis frames serve as a visual focus that directs visitors inwards and then twists to create the café/restaurant enclosure and a gift shop ‘carpeted’ with new gardens. Over time, these trellises will further integrate, overgrown with more than a dozen species of climbing plants. The expressed conical front is partly sunken to reduce their scale of impact, with the functional back-of-house spaces underground. Moreover, to continuously weave the trellis pattern appearing between the interior and exterior, the glazing imitates it in a zigzag arrangement, which assists the tall vertical structural span of the glass.

Garden Cafe

The design adheres to a simple material palette. The underground building elements front the mountain backdrop finished in raw cementitious finishes. The thin concrete shell vaulted structures embellished in white reminisce how traditional whitewashed Cape Dutch homesteads dot the landscape. The promenade scored in grey terrazzo adds to the elemental quality of the setting. After extensive research, oak was considered in terms of its durability and bendability to be the best timber for the trellis exposition.

Garden Cafe
Garden Cafe
Garden Cafe

Meyer & Associates, based in South Africa, assisted Steyn Studio in executing the project and aided to resolve a few sophisticated details. The project highlighted structural complexities and challenges during the construction phases due to the elaborate trellis frames and large parts of the building being underground. The encounters overcame with the aid of consulting engineers, expert manufacturers and specialist subcontractors evolving on the project.

Garden Cafe
Garden Cafe

The interior design of the garden café echoes an exquisite charm, shelving every nook and corner with garnished elegance. Interior designer, Liam Mooney Studio, designed the deli fit-outs and curation of contents in the gift shop. The stimulating design of the triangular deli counter and lighting directly responds to the two buildings, complementing and accentuating their resilient forms. Delicately oxidized brass and copper sheets clad the display plinths in the shop – adding wonderful dimension and texture to the spatial fervour. In honour of the Breedekloof inspired colour palette, the new cafe and shop embosom on the local vineyards, especially their tones and colour variations in autumn.

Garden Cafe

Project Details
Location: Bosjes Estate, Breedekloof Valley, Western Cape, SA
Design architect: Steyn Studio (UK)
Project architect: Meyer & Associates
Landscape architect: Square One Landscape Architects
Photography: Dave Southwood
Furniture & Fit-out Design: Liam Mooney Studio
Civil Engineer: AVDM Consulting Engineers
Electrical engineer: Bührmann Consulting Engineers
Mechanical engineer: Ekcon Consulting Engineers
Gross areas: Gardens | 2ha, Shop | 190 sqm, Deli | 550 sqm

Garden Cafe
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Mars: Life Enhancing Architecture on the Red Planet

© Hassell Studio

Humans have been exploring the Mars for quite a while now. With the first landing on the Red Planet in 1971 to sending over the first-ever successful rover in 1997, the explorations have now come to an expedition with several objectives.

2021 has also been a year for many firsts, with United States, China and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) launching their three simultaneous probes to collect samples and other research materials for widening the explorations.

Today these missions have been enhanced more to pave way for a manned spacecraft on Mars, a plan which Elon Musk predicts will come in action by the year 2022. 

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In recent years, spacecraft missions are seen to be running at a progressive speed due to various factors. The advent of 3D Printers, automated systems, precision in cutting edge technology, etc has allowed many design thinkers and architects to explore human colonization beyond Earth. Even NASA has been actively hosting competitions and collaborating with 3D Printing companies as well as architectural studios to develop a fundamental design to create their very own 3D Printed Habitats in space. 

Here are some of the projects that are increasing the growing possibilities of space explorations of human life on the red planet – Mars. 

Mars Colonization Project by ZA Architects

Architecture on Mars,
©ZA Architects

ZA Architects, a German-based architectural studio was a part of the Mars Colonization Project in 2013. Their design involved creating an underground network of caverns for human habitation on the planet of Mars. The firm used robotic technology as a foot rule to develop these caverns to even house a basalt processing plant in it along with an artificial glacier. This underground artificial glacier was envisioned to provide oxygen as well as water to the inhabitants. 

ICE House Project, NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge

Architecture on Mars © ICE House
© ICE House

In 2015, the ICE House Project won the 3D Printed Habitat Challenge. The project used native Martian materials by using 3D printing technology to create an ice dwelling to protect the inhabitants from excess radiation. 

Inflatable Modular Habitat by Team GAMMA

Architecture on Mars
© Team GAMMA

Team GAMMA in 2015 won second place in NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge by using a semi-automated regolith fabrication system (RAM). They created a protective shield around an inflatable modular structure. 

Mars Habitat by Foster & Partners 

©Foster & Partners

Foster & Partners have always been progressive by presenting their project for living on the Moon. They followed up by designing a modular home on Mars as well. It consisted of a settlement that was built by semi-autonomous and pre-programmed robots. Thus settlement was visioned to create robust living quarters from the native Martian rocks to house up to 4 inhabitants in one quarter. 

Mars Habitat by LavaHive

©Lavahive

Taking third place the design was a modular 3D Printed dwelling creating by a cutting edge building technique known as “lava casting”. The materials are recycled and reused, they were incorporated by using discarded materials from inhabitable structures. 

Mars Science City by BIG + Centro Espacial Mohammed Bin Rashid

© BIG

By 2017, BIG along with Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center and a team of engineers, scientists as well as designers created a project that simulates Martian weather conditions right on Earth. This project visions to cater various testing and research opportunities to withstand the Mars heat and radiation. This project was built using 3D Printing techniques. 

Mars Utopia by IDEA Architecture Office

© IDEA Architecture

Albero Villanueva, a Spanish architect from IDEA Architecture Office proposed a design that combined martian materials with fungus and mycelium to create a structural capacity that can withstand the harsh weather conditions. This will allow the inhabitants to have a protective atmosphere that is more hospitable to human life. 

The Virtual Mars City by Kieran Timberlake

© Kieran Timberlake

Following that year, Architects Fatima Olivieri, Efrie Friedlander and Rolando Lopez along with the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) along with NASA and the Teaching and Learning Research Institute (TLRI) to create a virtual city. This city is visioned to simulate self-sufficiency to accommodate 100 people. 

Zopherus Project

Architecture on Mars
© Modular

Designed by Trey lane, Tyler McKee, Austin Williams, Corey Guidry and Mark Hendel, the project won the third phase of NASA. It includes an autonomous robot that consists of an internal printing system. This creates a 3D Hexagonal structure with zero human interference. 

Marsha by AI Space Factory

Architecture on Mars © Ai Space Factory
© AI Spacefactory

This prototype from AI Spacefactory was the 2nd winner of the NASA 3D Printed Habitat Challenge. The project used basalt from the martian surface amalgamating it with robotics technology along with vegetable-based bioplastic. This, in turn, created a highly durable material. 

3D Printed Habitat by Hassell Studio

Architecture on Mars © Hassell Studio
© Hassell Studio
Architecture on Mars © Hassell Studio
© Hassell Studio

In collaboration with Hassell Studio along with Eckersley O’Callaghan (EOC), the 3D Printed Habitat was selected as one of the top ten entries for the NASA Centennial Challenge. The design is focused on maximum efficiency and output for providing comfort. With an exterior Regolith framework that is built by autonomous robots, the structure is in the form of pods. 

Martian Seed of Life by Warith Zaki and Amir Amazar

Architecture on Mars
© Warith Zaki and Amir Amazar

In the year 2019, the architects proposed settlements made up of bamboo. The investigation was started by seeking alternative materials as a resource for building Martian settlements. Bamboo as a primary material can withstand harsh weather conditions and can propagate too through pollinators. Due to this, Bamboo could grow in its atmosphere in abundance as there is a presence of carbon dioxide as well creating food for the human settlers too. 

NUWA by ABIBOO Studio 

©ABIBOO Studio

This particular project is an extension of scientific research curated by the SONet. The design was a modular take with various scalable fixtures forming a self-sufficient vertical city. It was also envisioned to be a self-sustaining city that can accommodate millions of inhabitants. 

In the advent of newer technology, robotics and 3d printing, space mission’s are set to be more diverse and reformatory. Many architects, design thinkers, engineers are rethinking their methods and are developing newer prototypes that would make one day, life on Mars a reality. 

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Mars: Life-Enhancing Architecture on the Red Planet

© Hassell Studio

Mars

Humans have been exploring Mars for quite a while now. From the first landing on the Red Planet in 1971 to sending over the first-ever successful rover in 1997, the explorations have come to an expedition with several objectives.

2021 has also been a year for many firsts, with the United States, China, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) launching their three simultaneous probes to collect samples and other research materials for widening exploration.

Today these missions have been enhanced more to pave the way for a human-crewed spacecraft on Mars, a plan which Elon Musk predicts will come into action by the year 2022. 

Subscribe to our newsletter

In recent years, spacecraft missions have been running at a progressive speed due to various factors. The advent of 3D Printers, automated systems, precision in cutting edge technology, etc., has allowed many design thinkers and architects to explore human colonization beyond Earth. Even NASA has been actively hosting competitions and collaborating with 3D Printing companies and architectural studios to develop a fundamental design to create their very own 3D Printed Habitats in space. 

Here are some of the projects increasing the growing possibilities of space explorations of human life on the red planet – Mars. 

Mars Colonization Project by ZA Architects

Architecture on Mars,
©ZA Architects

ZA Architects, a German-based architectural studio, was a part of the Mars Colonization Project in 2013. Their design involved creating an underground network of caverns for human habitation on the planet of Mars. The firm used robotic technology as a foot rule to develop these caverns, even to house a basalt processing plant and an artificial glacier. This underground artificial glacier was envisioned to provide oxygen and water to the inhabitants. 

ICE House Project, Clouds AO / SEArch

Architecture on Mars © ICE House
© Clouds Architecture Office

In 2015, the ICE House Project, designed by Clouds Architecture Office, won the competition for NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge. The project used native Martian materials by using 3D printing technology to create an ice dwelling to protect the inhabitants from excess radiation. Lead designers for the project include Ostap Rudakevych, Masayuki Sono, and Yuko Sono.

Inflatable Modular Habitat by Team GAMMA

Architecture on Mars
© Team GAMMA

Team GAMMA 2015 won second place in NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge using a semi-automated regolith fabrication system (RAM). They created a protective shield around an inflatable modular structure. 

Mars Habitat by Foster & Partners 

©Foster & Partners

Foster & Partners have always been progressive by presenting their project for living on the Moon. They followed up by designing a modular home on Mars as well. It consisted of a settlement that was built by semi-autonomous and pre-programmed robots. Thus settlement was visioned to create robust living quarters from the native Martian rocks to house up to 4 inhabitants in one quarter. 

Mars Habitat by LavaHive

©Lavahive

Taking third place, the design was a modular 3D Printed dwelling created by a cutting edge building technique known as “lava casting.” The materials are recycled and reused, and they were incorporated by using discarded materials from inhabitable structures. 

Mars Science City by BIG + Centro Espacial Mohammed Bin Rashid

© BIG

In 2017, BIG and Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center and a team of engineers, scientists, and designers created a project that simulates Martian weather conditions right on Earth. This project aims to cater to various testing and research opportunities to withstand the Mars heat and radiation. This project was built using 3D Printing techniques. 

Mars Utopia by IDEA Architecture Office

© IDEA Architecture

Albero Villanueva, a Spanish architect from IDEA Architecture Office, proposed a design that combined martian materials with fungus and mycelium to create a structural capacity to withstand harsh weather conditions. This will allow the inhabitants to have a more hospitable, protective atmosphere to human life. 

The Virtual Mars City by Kieran Timberlake

© Kieran Timberlake

Following that year, Architects Fatima Olivieri, Efrie Friedlander, Rolando Lopez, the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS), NASA, and the Teaching and Learning Research Institute (TLRI) created a virtual city. This city is visioned to simulate self-sufficiency to accommodate 100 people. 

Zopherus Project

Architecture on Mars
© Modular

Designed by Trey lane, Tyler McKee, Austin Williams, Corey Guidry, and Mark Hendel, the project won the third phase of NASA. It includes an autonomous robot that consists of an internal printing system. This creates a 3D Hexagonal structure with zero human interference. 

Marsha by AI Space Factory

Architecture on Mars © Ai Space Factory
© AI Spacefactory

This prototype from AI Spacefactory was the 2nd winner of the NASA 3D Printed Habitat Challenge. The project used basalt from the martian surface, amalgamating it with robotics technology along with vegetable-based bioplastic. This, in turn, created a highly durable material. 

3D Printed Habitat by Hassell Studio

Architecture on Mars © Hassell Studio
© Hassell Studio
Architecture on Mars © Hassell Studio
© Hassell Studio

In collaboration with Hassell Studio and Eckersley O’Callaghan (EOC), the 3D Printed Habitat was selected as one of the top ten entries for the NASA Centennial Challenge. The design is focused on maximum efficiency and output for providing comfort. With an exterior Regolith framework built by autonomous robots, the structure is in the form of pods. 

Martian Seed of Life by Warith Zaki and Amir Amazar

Architecture on Mars
© Warith Zaki and Amir Amazar

In the year 2019, the architects proposed settlements made up of Bamboo. The investigation was started by seeking alternative materials as a resource for building Martian settlements. Bamboo, as a primary material, can withstand harsh weather conditions and can propagate too through pollinators. Due to this, Bamboo could grow in its atmosphere in abundance as there is a presence of carbon dioxide and creating food for the human settlers. 

NUWA by ABIBOO Studio 

©ABIBOO Studio

This particular project is an extension of scientific research curated by the SONet. The design was a modular take with various scalable fixtures forming a self-sufficient vertical city. It was also envisioned as a self-sustaining city that could accommodate millions of inhabitants. 

With the advent of newer technology, robotics, and 3d printing, space missions are set to be more diverse and reformatory. Many architects, design thinkers, and engineers are rethinking their methods and developing newer prototypes that would make life on Mars a reality one day. 

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Flow Fields – Eco-Parametric Structures

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Scott Duillet + Luiz Felipe Silveira

‘Flow Fields’, the project developed in the PAACADEMY’s ‘Eco-Parametric Structures’ studio workshop by the talented students, Scott Duillet & Luiz Felipe Silveira is based on the concept of respectful coexistence between the structure and the site by collaborating nature as an inspiration.

The Eco-Parametric Structures workshop organized by PAACADEMY was held from 2nd March to the 13th April 2021 on an online platform. Studio Mamou-Mani is one of the studio workshops at the PAACADEMY with a focus on combining sustainability with parametric design. The studio with the 6 intriguing sessions lead by London based architect, Arthur Mamou-Mani and his team was articulated on the topic of wooden construction through computational design methods. The session focused on developing a parametric, modular and environmentally conscious system in an online studio through interactive workshops and discussions.

Click here to register and watch the recordings.

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© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Scott Duillet + Luiz Felipe Silveira

Natural obstructions such as trees and rocks govern openings to the ground and sky, allowing the users to witness the existing, and often overlooked, fields of natural elements and how responsive architecture can be. Due to its high flexibility and fast renewal capabilities, bamboo was the main resource used to materialize organic curves and achieve a low impact, clean construction process.

Using the function and its surroundings as parameters to derive form, the whole structure shapes itself according to the given site and boundaries. This kind of adaptability and scalability allows for different formations to emerge, all while keeping a similar, rationalized building process. The result is an open space pavilion that bends and collaborates with nature, offering an insight into the natural fields creating a sense of flow.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Scott Duillet + Luiz Felipe Silveira

Arthur Mamou – Mani and his team from Mamou-Mani led 6 intriguing sessions with PAACADEMY on creating an ecological solution through computational design methods. The session focused on developing a parametric, modular and environmentally conscious system in an online studio through interactive workshops and discussions.

Stay tuned with us to see more projects in the upcoming days from the PAACADEMY’s Eco-Parametric Structures workshop. Click here to register and watch the recordings.

Credits:

Studio workshop by PAACADEMY
Studio title: Eco-Parametric Structures
Lead by: Arthur Mamou-Mani and his team
Project name: Flow Fields
Students: Scott Duillet & Luiz Felipe Silveira
Date: 2nd March until 13th April 2021

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Senior Computational Designer at Adidas

Job Title: Senior Computational Designer
Brand: Adidas
Location: Portland
Team: Design
State: OR
Country/Region: US
Contract Type: Full Time
Number: 309004
Date: Apr 3, 2021

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Senior Computational Designer

World’s well-known footwear company, Adidas is looking for a full-time senior computational designer to join their design team in Portland, Oregon USA. Read more below and apply if you think you are the right candidate.

Purpose of Role:

  • Creatively lead the Computational Design team through direction and example, in achieving disruptive, innovation design for footwear and apparel concepts. Specifically, through use of computational design methods that will enable new unfound opportunity in performance improvements and overall product design impact.
  • Drive empathy for our consumers by contributing innovation design thinking, technology, process, materials and product solutions to fuel the future of the brand.
  • To guide the design team in connecting emotionally with our consumer through our design contribution. Fuel multiple concepts through expert computational design combined with exceptional design skills to visually and tangibly bring ideas to life with impact.
  • To provide an expert innovation knowledge base and approach. A technical understanding of programing code to develop ideas and concepts would be needed.
  • To contribute to the design team’s culture and creativity by example and through living daily our adidas 3C’s behaviors of Collaboration, Confidence, and Creativity.
  • To manage the design team’s major projects, productivity and processes.

Key Accountabilities:

  • Lead the 4D team in connecting emotionally with our consumer through our design contribution. Manifesting in a positive benefit driven brand experience, wrapped in a compelling and relevant story about the consumer’s Lives. 
  • Support the Sr Design Director in managing the design team toward a high level of productivity. Balancing the needs of the project teams with the capacity of the design team. 
  • Actively lead the team to contribute to all design projects so that computational design utility becomes a red thread through all design innovation platforms where we see opportunity to elevate. 
    Set an exemplary standard for Design Impact through your own design projects.
  • Managing those design projects in a confident manner with clear decision-making and productivity.
  • Genuine ownership of your own responsibilities as well as the greater responsibilities of the design team. A high level of autonomy from being “managed” by Sr Design Director is expected.
  • Management and development of direct reports through the #mybest, Individual Development Plans and all HR guidance programs. 
  • Managing external design consultant relationships and projects in a confident manner with clear decision-making.
  • Provide Design Leadership to Designers throughout the design process.
  • Provide vision to major innovation themes by translating consumer insights, desires, performance benefits, brand values, business opportunities, macro trends and technology opportunities into strategic consumer experience stories.
  • Set a high standard of engagement, passion and service to Innovation Project Teams, Research and Engineering.
  • Own and Co-ordinate the creative process to make sure that the final products meet Future, Inline Design and BU expectations for design impact, innovation and commercial objectives.
  • Develop in cooperation with appropriate Future project Team(s), relevant technologies, construction ideas and patterns through samples ensuring function and manufacturability.
  • Travel to the market places to get feedback from consumers, athletes, industry experts and retailers, and apply to overall design strategy.
  • Be at the global forefront of design technologies and be innovative in their application.
  • Support and nurture the design team’s overall culture. A positive, collaborative and supportive attitude is expected. Even in the face of conflict and challenge.
  • Plan and promote design team inspiration and collaboration.
  • Set a high standard of maturity in personal behavior and conduct. 
  • Set a high standard for work habits and productivity. Hold the team accountable to this standard.
  • Plan and conduct meetings and presentations with confidence and professional communication.
  • Build strong collaborative relationships with our adidas inline design and marketing colleagues.
  • Managing team design projects in a confident manner with clear decision-making.
  • Provide mentoring assistance to the junior design staff and interns.

Essential Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

  • Highly experienced designing for additive manufacturing, CNC milling, knitting or other computer to machine methods.
  • Highly knowledgeable in virtual shading/lighting, Rendering using Modo, Houdini or other comparable applications.
  • Knowledge in the latest trends and technologies.
  • Highly Collaborative and engaged by critique.
  • Exceptional verbal and written communication and storytelling skills. Fluency and confidence in inspiring teammates and clients with user-driven rationale.
  • Passion for tinkering, experimenting and trying out new technologies and hardware
  • Appetite for experimentation.
  • Deep knowledge in Adobe Creative suite
  • Sketching and Drawing skills are a plus.
  • Knowledge in 3D Animation, Rigging, or scripting is a plus
  • Minimum of 6 years of progressive experience in innovative Product / Footwear / Apparel design.
  • BS in, Industrial Design, Architecture, Computer Science, or relevant industry experience is required.
  • MS in Computer Science or related technical field is plus.


Requisite Qualifications:

  • BA or MA in Industrial Design / Computational design / Architecture or comparable.
  • Equivalent combination of education and experience may be substituted for degree.
  • Minimum of 6 years of progressive experience in innovative Product and Computational design.
  • Advanced knowledge of computer programs: Adobe Illustrator, Photo Shop, Grasshopper for Rhino 3D, Houdini, Scriptographer and or other comparable Generative design tools.
  • Ability to code, re. C+ is a plus.

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Climate Active Bricks: Smart Solutions to Trigger Climatic Change

CLIMATE ACTIVE BRICKS
CLIMATE ACTIVE BRICKS

The modern age comes with a price. Our world needs a constant update in the way we act and perform our duties. Every central urban configuration faces the ‘Urban Heat Island’ effect, drowning inhabitants in unescapable heat and adversity. A team of specialists has acted upon this to enshrine a positive change. The Climate Active Bricks project answers to climate-damaging urban architecture with innovative brick wall solutions.

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The team’s core idea cracks at modifying the case of microclimate in cities. In Germany, the context of climate change and inner-city compaction coins increasing heating of the urban structures. The ‘Climate Active Bricks Research Project’ investigate to engender favourable microclimate by altering wall elements using bricks on building facades.

CLIMATE ACTIVE BRICKS

The ground-breaking portrait of self-shadowing patterns elicited by digitally calculated masonry significantly reduces the wall’s surface temperature—the use of specially designed software aids in bringing down the ”operative temperature” inside the dwellings. The structural setting cognizes the solar radiation and results in weaving forms that block and shade.

CLIMATE ACTIVE BRICKS

One of the essential strategies to decrease the heat stress inside cities was through ample vegetation and green spaces. Subsequently improving the human comfort level and encouraging people to active use of the public space. In dense areas, where greenery cannot swell, the shading concept to create surfaces with minimized solar exposure works wonders.

The Story Behind The Craft

“With the Climate Active Bricks project, developed in August 2020 as part of a design-build summer school, we investigated whether we can apply digital design and robotic fabrication technology to improve the exterior facades of buildings directly. We explored whether the creation of customized site-specific self-shading effects in the external facades of buildings can reduce solar exposure and thus decrease the storing and radiation of heat to improve the ambient climate in urban areas.” – Climateflux

CLIMATE ACTIVE BRICKS

Devising digital simulations, the team analyzed various designs to shake the solar exposure of the brick constellations. The construction aroused without any modification of a typical flat brick. The bond’s flat front surface directly exposes to the sun, while a shift in the orientation brings the frontal brick towards the back. In addition, the exposure reduces through the shading of the adjacent protruding brick. Furthermore, to mitigate solar reflections the front brick rotates, changing the incidence and fall-out angle of sunlight. The larger the curve concerning the sun, the lower the value of the absorbed radiation, which results in a decrease of solar radiation and heat stress.

For a sustainable and green future, urban planners and architects must ponder and envision well-thought-out and robust solutions for a climate-friendly transformation of their cities and public spaces. In addition, the inculcation of data-driven simulation methods informs the planners’ digital design to elevate into an evolved visualization.

Location: Munich, Germany
Year: 2020
Collaborator: TUM Department of Architecture

Team:
Client: The Technical University of Munich, Department of Architecture
TT Professorship Digital Fabrication
Prof. Dr. sc. ETH Kathrin Dörfler
Dipl. Ing. Julia Fleckenstein
Associate Professorship of Architectural Design and Building Envelope
Dr.-Ing. Architekt Philipp Lionel Molter
Climateflux

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Aurora Viewing Platform / Eco-Parametric Structures

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk

The Eco-Parametric Structures workshop organized by PAACADEMY was held from 2nd March to the 13th April 2021 on an online platform. Studio Mamou-Mani is one of the studio workshops at the PAACADEMY with a focus on combining sustainability with parametric design. The studio with the 6 intriguing sessions lead by London based architect, Arthur Mamou-Mani and his team was articulated on the topic of wooden construction through computational design methods. The session focused on developing a parametric, modular and environmentally conscious system in an online studio through interactive workshops and discussions. 

Click here to register and watch the recordings.

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© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk

The Aurora Viewing Platform project was developed during the Eco-Parametric Structures workshop by Rosa Tellez and Ashley Kirk, two talented students at the PAACADEMY. The project is located in Abisko National Park in Sweden’s Arctic Circle. The main goal was to create a giant glowing Coral in the middle of the arctic landscape as a platform to observe Auroras and also to bring people as well as the communities together in the dark Arctic winters.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk

As described by the designers the Arctic regions and oceans are two of the most important ecosystems on the frontline in the climate crisis. And their temperature changes are twice that of the rest of the planet. The aim of this project is to bring these two fragile ecosystems together.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk

Corals were one of the inspirations of the project. “Corals are marine invertebrates within the class Anthozoa of the phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. Coral species include the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton” (Wikipedia). As they glow in the last attempt to invite their Zooxanthellae Algae back home after a bleaching event to survive as a community and continue providing habitats for many species.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk

Designers were also inspired by the polar regions that are threatened by dwindling ice cover. Also, Permafrost is thawing for the first time in centuries. “Permafrost is a permanently frozen layer on or under Earth’s surface. It consists of soil, gravel, and sand, usually bound together by ice. Permafrost usually remains at or below 0°C (32ºF) for at least two years. Permafrost can be found on land and below the ocean floor. It is found in areas where temperatures rarely rise above freezing. This means the permafrost is often found in Arctic regions such as Greenland, the U.S. state of Alaska, Russia, China, and Eastern Europe.” (national geographic)

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk

Inspired by patterns found in organ pipe Corals and natural systems, the Aurora Viewing Platform seeks to raise awareness about these threats to the future of our planet by spotlighting the effects of climate change and global warming through the mimicking of these natural warnings. “We believe small steps can make big changes over time.” Rosa Tellez & Ashley Kirk

Stay tuned with us to see more projects in the upcoming days from the PAACADEMY’s Eco-Parametric Structures workshop. Click here to register and watch the recordings.

Credits:

Studio workshop by PAACADEMY
Studio title: Eco-Parametric Structures
Lead by: Arthur Mamou-Mani and his team
Project name: Aurora Viewing Platform
Students: Rosa Tellez & Ashley Kirk
Date: 2nd March until 13th April 2021

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Blending Parametric Design with Sustainability

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Group 3 – Scott Duillet + Luiz Felipe Silveira

The Eco-Parametric Structures workshop organized by PAACADEMY was held from 2nd March untill 13th April 2021 via an online platform. Studio Mamou-Mani is one of the studio workshops at the PAACADEMY with a focus on comibining sustainbility with parametric design. The studio with the 6 intriguing sessions lead by London based architect, Arthur Mamou-Mani and his team was articulated on the topic of wooden construction through computational design methods. The session focused on developing a parametric, modular and environmentally conscious system in an online studio through interactive workshops and discussions. Click here to register and watch the recordings.

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A Quick Jist of the Eco – Parametric Workshop

The workshop was aimed to explore different materials from timber to plywood to develop surfaces, struts and nodes that are climate responsive while having a programmatic factor. It also included a descriptive narrative on how lattices, assembly sequences, digital fabrication and information extracting can be achieved through a parametric model. The workshop was focused on showcasing a dynamic aspect of parametric architecture that, is as functional and affordable while being aesthetic. 

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Group 6 – Eliana + Marc Antoine + Philippe + Santiago + Vincent

In today’s time when core architectural studio and architects like Bjarke Ingels Group, Foster & Partners, Ai Space Factory and many more are building structures through computational methods while making them environmentally conscious, having a skill set in that direction can truly be an asset. With this intent, the workshop focused on creating unique and adaptable projects that are maximizing the use of inexpensive materials to create realistic architectural projects. A deep insight on bottom-up design and curating modular system through matrices of parametric variations were also explored. 

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures / Rosa Tellez + Ashley Kirk

The eco-parametric workshop explored the bottom-up design, and how to grow modular systems through creating and learning from matrices of parametric variations. But most importantly the workshop was focused on how do we let our emotions drive us through a mathematical process. As paradoxical as it sounds. the workshop was focused on creating habitable spaces that are humane and high on computational design finesse. 

About the Tutor – Arthur Mamou-Mani

Arthu Mamou-Mani / © David Azia

Arthur Mamou-Mani is a French architect and director of the award-winning architecture practice Mamou-Mani. The practise specializes in a new kind of digitally designed and fabricated architecture. He is also a lecturer at the University of Westminster and has given numerous talks around the world on “Eco-Parametric” architectural practice which includes two TedX conferences in the U.S. and France. He has given many lectures on eco-parametric architecture in various institutes and platforms. 

A fellow of the Royal Society for Encouragement of the Arts Manufacture and Commerce, he has won the American Architecture Prize, the RIBAj Rising Star Award. He has been awarded the prestigious Pierre Cardin Prize for Architecture from the Academie des Beaux-Arts in France.

The Architects Journal in 2020 named the architectural practice as one of its 100 ‘Disruptor’ practices that are challenging the norms of traditional architecture practice in their drive to bring about sustainable alternatives. Arthur has also founded the digital fabrication laboratory FabPub. This allows the public to experiment with large-scale laser cutting and 3D printing equipment in Hackney, London.

He studied at the École Nationale supérieure d’architecture de Paris-Malaquais and in London, in 2003, at the Architectural Association School of Architecture. He then later worked at Zaha Hadid Architects, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, and Proctor and Matthews Architects. He started teaching Diploma Studio 10 in 2011 at the University of Westminster with Toby Burgess.

He built the Burning Man Temple in 2018, Galaxia, consisting of 20 timber truss petals converging as a spiral towards one point in the sky. He is the first non-US architect selected for this piece of art. In 2019, he designed Conifera, a 3D-printed bioplastic installation for COS, during Milan design week, in the 16th-century Palazzo Isimbardi.

Day 1

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

The workshop started with the Introduction to parametric and timber design techniques. It included an interactive session of Arthur Mamou-Mani taking the students through some of his astounding works while interacting actively with the students. The core idea behind was to create systems and not forms. Mamou-Mani also took the students through the chronology of parametric architecture and its development over the years. 

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

The session included a three-hour long lecture with a 1-hour long introduction to GH Mirror lab. The session gave a concise jist of the complexity that parametric architecture can resolve through calculative methods. 

Day 2

Day 2 explored the various facets of Rhino and Grasshopper through an interactive session. The session focused on providing easy solutions in creating complex geometries. It also explored the various plugins and their advantages while exploring other geometry fundamentals.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

Different new terminologies in Rhino were introduced, possibilities of each nerve to create dynamic surfaces, organic structures and creating them through computational design methods were explored.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

The workshop also had an interactive student discussion through presentations on various eco-parametric designs of organic plants by exploring their growth, shape, geometries, design aesthetics, patterns, organizational principles, architectural aspects, biomimicry, etc.

Day 3

Day 3 of the eco-parametric workshop included the study of Grasshopper intermediate with complex data trees and intriguing digital fabrication methods to create advanced structuring.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

Exploring form works and 3d patterns, the know-how of the possibilities in eco-parametric architecture, studying various organic species and their design pattern, highlights the precision of various plant species were some of the topics that were explored in the workshop.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

Day 4

Day 4 went a stage higher by introducing the students to advanced Grasshopper using various plugins like Kangaroo, Weaverbird, Hoopsnake, Octopus, Karamba, Parakeet, etc. The ideation behind it was to help the students in creating a fully integrated model using timber and other eco-materials.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures


Arthur Mamou-Mani and the team precisely took over the entire narrative of creating these complex geometries by showcasing varied dynamicity in the field of eco-parametric design. Carmen Hu, a member from Arthur Mamou-Mani’s office introduced the advanced geometries in Grasshopper in an intriguing session.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

Followed by an interesting review session of the students work with Arthur Mamou-Mani giving his insightful reviews on their works.

Day 5

Day 5 the students created parametric matrices both digitally and physically. This was followed by an interactive review session by Arthur Mamou-Mani which proved to be resourceful to the students.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

Material studies, Learning about curves, workshop on grasshopper plugins to create clean geometric forms while internalizing the surfaces, etc were some of the informative learnings that helped students in creating intriguing forms.

Day 6

Day 6 mapped the project development of creating timber structures through the learning from earlier sessions. The students presented their final presentations. The session was joined by Nuru Karim, from Nudes, India as a guest juror.

Architect Nuru Karim, Founder & Principal Nudes received his Masters in Architecture and Urban-ism from the Architectural Association [AADRL] London, United Kingdom in 2006. His undergraduate studies include travel and education in the metropolis of Mumbai [KRVIA-gold medallist] and Montreal [McGill University]. He has worked for Zaha Hadid Architects in 2005 on a host of institutional projects both in competition/ schematic design and design development stages.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

The ideas of the workshop were to introduce the natural environment in parametric architecture and how can we implement them in creating structures that are both aesthetic and ecological. By exploring materials and facets of the possibilities of computational methods the students did just that. They created their very own astounding end – products in a mere 6 session workshop. Interactive outdoors sessions like going to the park and observing nature and presenting their insights on the different forms or exploring the various facets of biophilic architectural possibilities in detail helped them in creating dynamic forms.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

The session included the final presentation of each group to create a collaborative outcome. Students created exciting end products by applying symmetry to create a crystalline and biophilic architectural system. From various shapes like circles, spines and vectors they used the systems of rotations, double rotations, etc.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures
© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

Exploring and ideating various external and internal parameters through the creation of plane sand struts helped them understand the complexity from the bottom up.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

Deep insights on Mirrolab, Rhino 7 and Grasshopper helped them understand biophilic architecture through computational design methods.

© PAACADEMY – Studio Mamou-Mani / Eco-Parametric Structures

All in all, the Eco-Parametric Structures by PAACADEMY was a one-stop shop to gain knowledgeable insights in the field of blending ecological architecture with futuristic computational and parametric design tools. Stay tuned with us for the publication of the all projects with their unique details. Also, you can click here to register and watch the recordings.

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NG Architects Visualize a Twirling Ivy Office in Iran

Ivy Office

An office or a workspace edifice has evolved over many years, transforming and adapting its abstract form, function, and style. NG Architects define something woven between modernistic and parametric fabric in bestowing the Ivy Office building in Iran. An office as a second home was the striking thought of architect Navid Ghandili when he embarked on this design problem. While conceiving the aesthetics and practicality of the design, the designers ushered in the presence of users in their working place, how they use most hours of the day.

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The spirited initiation took off, delivering an environmental concept to the observer. The interior décor and furnishings intertwine great emphasis on transparency and openness of the office space; it provides a healthy administrative space and creates an alternative concept for an office building.

Ivy Office
Ivy Office

The front tower enthrals its innovative skin carved by six cuboidal frames standing long and rigid, twirling at certain positions and capturing the passing people’s attention. The architecture stands out unique along the linear street. The project locates on a site of 620 sqm. The whole volume exposed as a rectangular cube with a concrete shell, integrated with wood in the form of ivy, rotates about the facade from inside the cube.

Ivy Office

From the east side, the building retreats to take the company of a splendid façade view invoking the natural light indoors. On every floor, small terraces jut out to blend the staff with the outside world, also aids as a refreshment spot. The main structure is imagined to erect using reinforced concrete with the “cobiax” technology. The combination of concrete, wood and curtain wall in the façade emulates an organic and breathing architectural drama. The wooden parts seam well with the steel that forays behind.

The building also contrives underground parking with a capacity of 24 cars. A café with a cosy terrace incorporates the lobby on the ground floor and workplaces placing well above. In addition to the five office floors, a distinct arrangement of management and conference room spaces, along with an accounting room, a staff room, a kitchen and two bathrooms. Moreover, the roof provides a green space for exclusive office events.
The Ivy Office is the winning project of NG Architects for the 2020 OPAL Awards in commercial low rise structures.

Ivy Office

Ivy Office

Project Details
Project Name: Ivy Office
Architecture Firm: NG Architects
Principal Architect: Navid Ghandili
Project Location: Tehran, Iran
Built Area: 3000 sqm
Site Area: 620 sqm
Visualization & Interior Design: Navid Ghandili
Typology: Office Building (Commercial, Low-Rise)
Competition Name: OPAL AWARD

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